Did God Really Say Woman Is Inferior to Man?

I was following the geneology of Noah and came to the account of Terah.  The Bible doesn’t say much about Terah, but what it does say speaks volumes.  One of the only things that seemed to be of any importance about Terah was that he had three sons, or so I thought.  He had Abram, who eventually became Abraham, Nahor, and Haran.  And as I read about these three sons, I thought about how thru the nine generations or so after Noah, man once again had strayed from the direction of God’s will and imposed his own interpretation of the way things should be.

Take for example the three sons of Terah. All three of them had a very low opinion of   God’s role for the female creation.  I can only speculate that this thinking had been passed down for quite a while because certainly these three sons didn’t just wake up and decide it on their own one morning.

One of his son’s, Haran, was also the father of three children.  He had a daughter named Milcah, a second child named Iscah, who sex is not mentioned,  and Lot- yes, the same Lot from the Biblical account of Sodom and Gomorrah.

E9969430-9881-4617-BA54-70C87C5CD212Milcah, Haran’s daughter, was given to his brother, Nahor, in marriage.  Hence, he was Milcah’s uncle.  So this marriage was incestuous.  I have heard many people say that inter family marriage happened all the time back in those days.  Maybe so. But it was not necessary to marry that close in the blood line any longer.  There had been at least nine generations since Noah.  There was quite a group on the earth again, and these people were still living longer than you or I, meaning they each had lots of children, and those children had children and so on.   So,  I find it disturbing that Milcah, had to marry the man who had watched her grow up, whom she called Uncle.  It is perverted, regardless of whether or not families inter married.  Not only is it perverted on her Uncle Nahor’s side, but it is also disturbing that Haran gave his daughter to his brother.  I wonder what Haran got in return for her?  You know he would have received something.  Men traded women as they did cattle – for financial gain.  I wonder what the conversation was between Nahor and Haran.  Who initiated it?  Was it Nahor who just had to have Milcah as his wife, or was it Haran who wanted something that Nahor owned and so he traded his daughter for it?  Did it not bother him that his brother, who was many years older than his daughter,  was going to be having sex with his daughter?    Where is the value of her as a human being with feelings?   And Haran passed on this lack of care for a human woman to his own son, Lot.

If you recall that story, there was a group of men surrounding Lot’s home because Lot had two male visitors inside his home.  What did Lot do?  He told this group of men, a group so large that they surrounded his home, that he would give them his daughters, who were virgins, and they could do anything they wanted with his daughters.  In otherwords, he cared less if his two innocent daughters were gang raped by a group of filthy men.  I can only imagine the fear those girls must have had listening to their father says such a thing – knowing he didn’t care about their safety or value them as human beings.  They were pawns to be used as a man so intentioned.

And then there is Abram.  We want to believe he was a righteous man because God used him, but the fact is, he was no better than his brothers and his nephew, Lot when it came to valuing a woman.  Abram was married to Sarai, his half-sister,  and they were in the land of Egypt and to protect himself,  he has his wife Sarai lie and tell the Egyptians that she is his sister and not his wife so they will treat HIM well.  And all the while he is being treated well and having cattle and animals lavished on him, she is taken to the palace and made to be the wife of the Pharoah.  She was in a position of having to have sex with a man, other than her husband, risk having a child and did Abram care?  No.  He was taught, like his brothers, that woman are to be used for sex, bearing children, and bargaining them like property to better oneself or, as in this case, protect oneself.   This thinking was not of God.  Nowhere did God ever say for them to treat women in such a manner.  God’s directive was that a woman was to be a helper, not a slave, not a tool for barter, not a lower human creation.  After all, she too was made in the image of God.

Just thinking about this downfall of man shows how corrupt and perverted the human mind can become when left to its own.  I find it very interesting that before God used Abram, he told him to “leave your country, your people, and your father’s household.”  That shows me that God needed him away from the influence of the corrupt way of living and thinking and needed him to go elsewhere.  And God did use Abram, then.  He then became the Abraham that went on to become a faithful follower of God.

So for all the Bible doesn’t say about Terah in the geneology, it speaks volumes because it shows how the knowledge he imparted to his sons, was not from God.  And it shows how it filtered down thru his sons, and his son’s son, and actually continued for many generations.  But make no mistake, it was never a command from God.

 

Extend the Olive Branch

I love when I read things and see symbolism and comparisons in text that I am reading.  For example, I read that when Noah was on the ark he “sent out a dove to see if the water had receded from the surface of the ground. But the dove could find no place to set its feet because there was water over all the surface of the earth.”

I bet you are thinking, ‘big deal’?  Well, it is a big deal.  Don’t you see it?  Take a peek back at the beginning of the book of Genesis Chapter 1 and the second half of verse number 2.  It states, “…and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.” Now, look at the book of Matthew chapter 3  and the second half of verse 16, “..and he saw the Spirit of God, descending like a dove and landing on him (Jesus).”

So back to Noah, you see the dove hovering over the water looking for a place to land and you see at creation the spirit of God hovering over the waters.  Then you see in Matthew the spirit of God being described as a dove.  I mean, Noah could have sent out a pigeon.  Why the dove?  And when the dove finally did find something, what did it find?  It found an olive leaf.  Again, big deal, right?  Yes, it is !  Think about what an olive leaf or an olive branch represents – peace.  Ever hear of the saying, “extend the olive branch to your enemy?”  Well, it is a symbol here in the Bible as if the time of punishment or war with mankind is over and now God’s anger has been appeased and He is extending the olive branch for the future of mankind.  He seals this with the institution of the rainbow stating He will never again flood the earth.  4EBA9169-5340-4A22-ADB8-F11FD2C603F5

I think that over and over and over in the Bible God is continually pointing us to Himself. These are not just stories for history that are recorded. I think that God inspired the writing of the Bible, and within the writing He is continually reminding us of His sovereignty. We just need to open our eyes and our minds to see what is right in front of our face.

Only one righteous man?

Have you ever given thought to verse 5 in Genesis chapter 6 that states “ …every inclination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil all the time….” referring to the status of the inhabitant’s on the earth during the time right before the Great Flood?

I have to stop there and really ask myself the question, ‘How can EVERY inclination be ONLY evil?’  How could there not be any good thought, at one time or another, in ANY of these people?  What had occurred on the earth to cause such a degeneration of society to this degree?  We know from the genealogy in Chapter 5 that thousands of years had passed since the Creation of man and the Garden of Eden.  So what exactly happened?  Were there no good people on the earth besides Noah?  I pause to ask you to think of our country, America.  Can you imagine within our population there being only ONE good person that God finds favor with enough to spare that person from destruction while pronouncing judgment on all the rest?  It is almost an inconceivable thought.  Yet this is what is written in the Bible.

I am more inclined to believe that the idea here that is being conveyed was that man’s moral compass had degenerated to such a degree and they had no remorse for their sins or the sins of their generation, nor did they consider God in anything they did.  God was a non-existent entity for them at that time.   Very similar to what is happening in our country and countries around the world today.  What exactly do I mean?

Take a simple example when I was in high school during the 80’s.  A pregnant girl was considered shameful and you thought of her with less than good thoughts.  You simply didn’t hang around with her.  In the same way, there was a certain respect that you had for parents and teachers and adults.  To attend church was a common practice and sin was considered exactly that – sin.  You simply didn’t have torture and murder as a commonplace news item.  Today, we accept pregnant teens as “normal” and disrespect to others as “common”.  Most people don’t attend church or attempt to help those less fortunate.  Videotaping torture is something people enjoy posting to social media.  We live in a very morally sick society.  Our moral compass today has degenerated drastically from even what it was even during my own short lifetime.  So it is not difficult to believe that after thousands of years since the Creation, it is more of a moral degeneration of society that is being described here than it is that man sat around and only thought of evil thoughts.  I believe this is the idea behind the “thoughts of his heart was only evil all the time” idea.  I can back up this thought process by looking at verse 11, “now the earth was corrupt in God’s sight and was full of violence.  God saw how corrupt the earth had become, for all the people on earth had corrupted their ways.”   And, in contrast,  God looked at Noah’s heart and realized he still had a good moral compass, and that out of all the inhabitants on the earth, Noah still had a heart for God and wanted to please God and do right – which is why Noah is written about as a righteous man.  However, even Noah had his faults and he could not have been perfectly good because we know that just shortly after the ark landing his sons find him drunk.  And while drunkenness was not a becoming quality, it was not a disqualifying character quality to condemn him to a watery grave as the others were condemned to. B48F10BA-5CB6-486A-A6EF-F798FCA3C5CB

But more so than any of this, I see in this passage how God hints to us as Noah being a pre-cursive type of savior to the preservation of the human race on the earth, just as Jesus Christ would be, but only Jesus Christ would be the perfect righteous man to save the human race for eternal salvation.

Lamech’s arrogance

Lamech, a fifth generation of Cain’s dependents, (if I have counted correctly) follows the same pattern of ungodliness as Cain did.  There is so much to discover about Lamech that the six verses he is mentioned in the Bible almost make him seem like a “passover reading”, so to speak. But his fifteen minutes of fame have a lot to show us.

Genesis chapter 4 verse 19 begins with the phrase, “Lamech married two women…”. Okay, let’s start there because it caused me to wonder when did the marrying of multiple women come into existence?  It wasn’t as though one of his wives had died and the other was the second wife – verse 23 disputes that fact.  So it is stated as if the marrying of more than one woman had been a practice for a while because the writer of Genesis never comments on it other than to say “Lamech married two women” – sort of nonchalantly.   So logically,  somewhere between Cain “laying with his wife (singular)” in verse 17 and Lamech being married to two women in verse 19, life on the earth had changed quite drastically from God’s original plan of one man and one woman, as in Adam and Eve.  Now this “marrying of more than one woman” might not have been the practice every where on earth at the time, but it was certainly the practice in the Cainite civilization and the city of Enoch, which Cain had built.

And so we see that Lamech called his wives together in verse 23 and explains to them that he, like his ancestor Cain, is also a murderer.  He states, “I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me.”  The Bible doesn’t tell us what type of “wound” it was.  Maybe it was a territorial argument and a physical fight.  Maybe it was a financial wound in that the “young man” stole a piece of property owned by Lamech, like a sheep or something.  The two important things here are that the man was “young” and Lamech had a foul temper – a temper so foul that instead of dealing with a situation as an adult, he resorted to murder and hatred for another human being – very similar to Cain.  And was the young man a teenager?  The writer made special note that it was a young man not an adult man.  Was the penalty for killing a “young man” different during those times?  I don’t know.

It is also important to make you aware that he told his wives about it.  Doesn’t it make you wonder why?  Men during those days did not value a woman’s opinion, nor were women treated like anything other than property and baby machines.  So isn’t it curious that he tells his wives about his crime? It is almost as if he is running or hiding in a way, like, “Quick come here, I have to tell you this before anyone else shows up or finds out.”  Was he expecting his wives to cover for him in some way?  Was he going to run away and he needed to tell them before he left?  We can only wonder.

But it is his arrogance in the next verse, verse 24, that I find incredible.  He states, “If Cain is avenged seven times, then Lamech seventy-seven times.”  So first off, we are aware that God had placed a mark on Cain after Cain had killed Abel and God was sending him away so that if anyone attempted to kill Cain, then they would suffer vengeance seven times over – a vengeance decreed from Almighty God.  But at this point in the Bible when Lamech makes his statement, we are unaware of anyone who attempted to harm Cain, and furthermore, the knowledge of this “vengeance” had been passed down through multiple generations because Lamech knew of it.  Maybe the noticeable mark on Cain was a physical marking that somehow set him apart from the others and so when people talked about why Cain was different it became known what he had done to his brother Abel and the vengeance decreed against anyone who tried to “avenge” Abel’s blood.   Again, we do not know.  All we know is that Lamech knows about the vengeance if anyone were to harm Cain because Lamech mentions it in his statement to his wives. B124624A-3D36-45A7-9CE8-43E4CE051902

But here Lamech thinks that his own sin of murder isn’t possibly as bad as Cain’s and therefore he (Lamech) should have more vengeance if someone tries to harm him because of his sin.  Basically, he is saying, “Listen my wives.  While it is true I did something bad, it wasn’t nearly as bad as what Cain did.  I was JUSTIFIED because that man injured me, whereas Cain killed Abel when Abel did nothing to him to deserve it.  The man I killed deserved it.”  Doesn’t it amaze you how he tries to justify his sin of murder and make himself out to be the victim in the situation? And doesn’t it amaze you how he feels that he is worthy to pass judgement on anyone who tries to harm him because of his sin?

It is of further curiosity to see how the writer of Genesis leaves the story there.  He mentions it and then nothing further is noted.  Why even mention it?  It had to have some importance if it were to be mentioned and included in the Bible.  I think the lessons here are to show us that civilization had continued to degrade into a downward sinful spiral.  That only five generations removed from the first-born child of Adam and Eve,  man had continued to disregard God and HIS laws.  It also shows us that man had no reverence for God in that man thought he could place himself into the righteous seat of God and invoke a binding punishment on his fellow man.

We never hear from Lamech again, nor do we know what happened to him.  I do know this, however.  Lamech eventually died, whether by the hands of another or by natural causes.  Lamech’s sin will be judged and he will be held to account by the only One who can pronounce judgement – God – and this God sees all and saw the truth to what Lamech had done – just as He does with us.