Did God Really Say Woman Is Inferior to Man?

I was following the geneology of Noah and came to the account of Terah.  The Bible doesn’t say much about Terah, but what it does say speaks volumes.  One of the only things that seemed to be of any importance about Terah was that he had three sons, or so I thought.  He had Abram, who eventually became Abraham, Nahor, and Haran.  And as I read about these three sons, I thought about how thru the nine generations or so after Noah, man once again had strayed from the direction of God’s will and imposed his own interpretation of the way things should be.

Take for example the three sons of Terah. All three of them had a very low opinion of   God’s role for the female creation.  I can only speculate that this thinking had been passed down for quite a while because certainly these three sons didn’t just wake up and decide it on their own one morning.

One of his son’s, Haran, was also the father of three children.  He had a daughter named Milcah, a second child named Iscah, who sex is not mentioned,  and Lot- yes, the same Lot from the Biblical account of Sodom and Gomorrah.

E9969430-9881-4617-BA54-70C87C5CD212Milcah, Haran’s daughter, was given to his brother, Nahor, in marriage.  Hence, he was Milcah’s uncle.  So this marriage was incestuous.  I have heard many people say that inter family marriage happened all the time back in those days.  Maybe so. But it was not necessary to marry that close in the blood line any longer.  There had been at least nine generations since Noah.  There was quite a group on the earth again, and these people were still living longer than you or I, meaning they each had lots of children, and those children had children and so on.   So,  I find it disturbing that Milcah, had to marry the man who had watched her grow up, whom she called Uncle.  It is perverted, regardless of whether or not families inter married.  Not only is it perverted on her Uncle Nahor’s side, but it is also disturbing that Haran gave his daughter to his brother.  I wonder what Haran got in return for her?  You know he would have received something.  Men traded women as they did cattle – for financial gain.  I wonder what the conversation was between Nahor and Haran.  Who initiated it?  Was it Nahor who just had to have Milcah as his wife, or was it Haran who wanted something that Nahor owned and so he traded his daughter for it?  Did it not bother him that his brother, who was many years older than his daughter,  was going to be having sex with his daughter?    Where is the value of her as a human being with feelings?   And Haran passed on this lack of care for a human woman to his own son, Lot.

If you recall that story, there was a group of men surrounding Lot’s home because Lot had two male visitors inside his home.  What did Lot do?  He told this group of men, a group so large that they surrounded his home, that he would give them his daughters, who were virgins, and they could do anything they wanted with his daughters.  In otherwords, he cared less if his two innocent daughters were gang raped by a group of filthy men.  I can only imagine the fear those girls must have had listening to their father says such a thing – knowing he didn’t care about their safety or value them as human beings.  They were pawns to be used as a man so intentioned.

And then there is Abram.  We want to believe he was a righteous man because God used him, but the fact is, he was no better than his brothers and his nephew, Lot when it came to valuing a woman.  Abram was married to Sarai, his half-sister,  and they were in the land of Egypt and to protect himself,  he has his wife Sarai lie and tell the Egyptians that she is his sister and not his wife so they will treat HIM well.  And all the while he is being treated well and having cattle and animals lavished on him, she is taken to the palace and made to be the wife of the Pharoah.  She was in a position of having to have sex with a man, other than her husband, risk having a child and did Abram care?  No.  He was taught, like his brothers, that woman are to be used for sex, bearing children, and bargaining them like property to better oneself or, as in this case, protect oneself.   This thinking was not of God.  Nowhere did God ever say for them to treat women in such a manner.  God’s directive was that a woman was to be a helper, not a slave, not a tool for barter, not a lower human creation.  After all, she too was made in the image of God.

Just thinking about this downfall of man shows how corrupt and perverted the human mind can become when left to its own.  I find it very interesting that before God used Abram, he told him to “leave your country, your people, and your father’s household.”  That shows me that God needed him away from the influence of the corrupt way of living and thinking and needed him to go elsewhere.  And God did use Abram, then.  He then became the Abraham that went on to become a faithful follower of God.

So for all the Bible doesn’t say about Terah in the geneology, it speaks volumes because it shows how the knowledge he imparted to his sons, was not from God.  And it shows how it filtered down thru his sons, and his son’s son, and actually continued for many generations.  But make no mistake, it was never a command from God.

 

Water cannot make all things clean

I sometimes imagine what it must have been like to be aboard the ark. To see and to hear the raging waters all around me, and to know that the only thing separating me from being consumed by the water was the boat I was on. I would have been thinking about every board that was put together to make the boat. And I would be reviewing, in my mind, if I had put enough pitch on it to keep the water out!

But, if I were Noah, I would have been thinking that when it was all said and done, my family and I would have been the only survivors of the human race. I would have been thinking that we would be the ones that future generations would look to for guidance and wisdom, that we would not be like the others – the ones that had perished in this terrible flood that God had to bring about because of their wickedness.

Soon after Noah and his family left the ark, and they were given the blessing by God to “be fruitful and increase in number and fill the earth”, it became apparent that sin was still present. Sin would always be present. A flood could not wipe that away.

13BAA876-32A0-44A2-9DE3-842552CB8270Because, there came a time after Noah had planted a vineyard that he made himself some wine. Now if you have ever planted a grape vine, you know they don’t produce in abundance right away. So the fact that he made wine and made enough wine to become drunk indicates that several seasons had come and gone, probably about three to four years or so. And while Noah was drunk one day, his son, Canaan, walked into the tent and saw his father passed out and naked. I always stop here and think about this tent. Was it Noah’s personal residence, or was it a community type tent? I think if it were his personal residence then it is like someone walking into your home and finding you laying on your couch drunk and naked. What would give them the right to just waltz into your home? Again, if it was his personal tent, wouldn’t his wife had covered him if she were there? In fact, the Bible never mentions his wife again. Maybe she died? Maybe that is why he was drunk? Also, the Bible tells us that the other two brothers were outside. So were they all looking for their father and then Canaan decided to go in to the tent and see if Noah was “home”? Regardless, Noah was drunk, and Noah was naked.

When Canaan found his father in that condition he had no manners or respect for his father and left him in that state of condition and walked outside to tell his brothers. In other words, to make fun of him. But we see the brothers are so bothered when they hear of their father’s nakedness, that they take a garment, lay it across both of their shoulders and walk in backwards, so as not to look upon their father’s nakedness. They had respect for their father. And when Noah awoke from his drunken stupor, he “found out what his youngest son had done to him…” he was very angry, and he cursed Canaan’s future existence.

The hopes that Noah had for a better population of people, than those that were destroyed by the flood, was not to be. The flood couldn’t do the job that needed to be done. There was a way, though, to accomplish what needed to be done. They just didn’t know it yet. And this story is another foreshadowing, to me, of the need for God’s solution to the problem of sin.

No Time to Build a Ladder

The story of Noah’s ark is one of the most known Biblical accounts, similar to the familiarity of the story of Adam and Eve.  I wonder how many of us missed the symbolism within this story that points to another coming destruction?  While the story of the Great Flood shows the destruction of physical man for his wickedness on the earth, the story also has an underlying parallel for the coming destruction of spiritual man for his wickedness in the end times.

In the account of Noah, we see that Noah was 500 years old when he began the ark and 600 years old when he completed it.  That means that God allowed one hundred years to pass before he pronounced judgement.  That gave one hundred years for man and woman to come and witness “the crazy man who was building a ship in the desert.”  One hundred years to ask questions to Noah and to seek God and inquire as to why this was going on. One hundred years to look upon themselves and their moral condition.  But not one of them realized that during that one hundred years there was a patient God waiting for them to repent.  One hundred long years – in which none, not even one of them changed from their wicked ways. And we all know the outcome – they drowned and perished for their wickedness that had, for a long time, brought God grief and caused Him to bring about this worldwide flood.  Those people are remembered no more, and they were eternally separated from God.

But I have stop to think about how this scene could have occurred.  The waters had to rise quickly from the ground as well as pour out heavily from the skies.  It would have had to be a quick destruction because Noah wasn’t the only one with a boat.  After all, there were fishermen.  They would have had boats.  There were carpenters.  They could have made a boat or a raft or even a ladder to climb up on Noah’s boat.  No, this wasn’t a slow flood.  This was a quick and immediate destruction.  So quick that there was no time for them to do anything to save themselves.  Their time for salvation had passed.  They had one hundred years to change their destiny.  They used those hundred years to scorn and laugh at Noah.  But they were not laughing when the flood came – the flood he had been telling them about for one hundred years.  No, they weren’t laughing.

5E8C77B8-FD3E-4D81-BC45-8C0400F1FBA8Can you imagine the panic and the terror?  People running around, crying and screaming.  Mother’s grabbing their babies and small children in an attempt to protect them – maybe by running to a higher ground.  People running to the area where Noah had been faithfully building the ark.  And those cries and screams  would have certainly carried in the air to the ears of Noah.  I can almost imagine him and his family inside the ark as it is being lifted off the ground, listening to what was happening on the outside of the ark.  But the Bible tells us that “God shut the door” to the ark.  It was not to be opened until the time in which God directed Noah to do so.  And for those people who were perishing in a watery grave, it was a punishment that didn’t have to be.  They had time – one hundred years to be exact – time to turn away from their wickedness.  Time to turn and beg a holy God for forgiveness.  But they didn’t, and so God fulfilled his decree of wiping them from the face of the earth.

And that is how I think it will be in the end times.  I think that God has been giving us time – Time since the creation of the world – Time since the garden of Eden when he pronounced the judgement on the serpent and also foreshadowed the coming Savior within that very punishment.  Centuries and centuries of time have been given.  I think the story of Noah is a foreshadowing of how the end will be.  God will make his final judgement quick and without any more warning.  The screaming and crying will waft upward, but that will not change the situation. Man will be destroyed for his wickedness.  Man will suffer the ultimate punishment, which is the eternal separation from a Holy God.  And I believe this is what is overlooked in the story of Noah.  It wasn’t just about a physical destruction of man.  It was also about a spiritual destruction and a foreshadowing of the ultimate coming destruction.

 

(Don’t forget to check out our latest video, The Plan is Redemption, on our website, https://marysfingerprint.com/a-chat-with-mom/  )

 

 

Lamech’s arrogance

Lamech, a fifth generation of Cain’s dependents, (if I have counted correctly) follows the same pattern of ungodliness as Cain did.  There is so much to discover about Lamech that the six verses he is mentioned in the Bible almost make him seem like a “passover reading”, so to speak. But his fifteen minutes of fame have a lot to show us.

Genesis chapter 4 verse 19 begins with the phrase, “Lamech married two women…”. Okay, let’s start there because it caused me to wonder when did the marrying of multiple women come into existence?  It wasn’t as though one of his wives had died and the other was the second wife – verse 23 disputes that fact.  So it is stated as if the marrying of more than one woman had been a practice for a while because the writer of Genesis never comments on it other than to say “Lamech married two women” – sort of nonchalantly.   So logically,  somewhere between Cain “laying with his wife (singular)” in verse 17 and Lamech being married to two women in verse 19, life on the earth had changed quite drastically from God’s original plan of one man and one woman, as in Adam and Eve.  Now this “marrying of more than one woman” might not have been the practice every where on earth at the time, but it was certainly the practice in the Cainite civilization and the city of Enoch, which Cain had built.

And so we see that Lamech called his wives together in verse 23 and explains to them that he, like his ancestor Cain, is also a murderer.  He states, “I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me.”  The Bible doesn’t tell us what type of “wound” it was.  Maybe it was a territorial argument and a physical fight.  Maybe it was a financial wound in that the “young man” stole a piece of property owned by Lamech, like a sheep or something.  The two important things here are that the man was “young” and Lamech had a foul temper – a temper so foul that instead of dealing with a situation as an adult, he resorted to murder and hatred for another human being – very similar to Cain.  And was the young man a teenager?  The writer made special note that it was a young man not an adult man.  Was the penalty for killing a “young man” different during those times?  I don’t know.

It is also important to make you aware that he told his wives about it.  Doesn’t it make you wonder why?  Men during those days did not value a woman’s opinion, nor were women treated like anything other than property and baby machines.  So isn’t it curious that he tells his wives about his crime? It is almost as if he is running or hiding in a way, like, “Quick come here, I have to tell you this before anyone else shows up or finds out.”  Was he expecting his wives to cover for him in some way?  Was he going to run away and he needed to tell them before he left?  We can only wonder.

But it is his arrogance in the next verse, verse 24, that I find incredible.  He states, “If Cain is avenged seven times, then Lamech seventy-seven times.”  So first off, we are aware that God had placed a mark on Cain after Cain had killed Abel and God was sending him away so that if anyone attempted to kill Cain, then they would suffer vengeance seven times over – a vengeance decreed from Almighty God.  But at this point in the Bible when Lamech makes his statement, we are unaware of anyone who attempted to harm Cain, and furthermore, the knowledge of this “vengeance” had been passed down through multiple generations because Lamech knew of it.  Maybe the noticeable mark on Cain was a physical marking that somehow set him apart from the others and so when people talked about why Cain was different it became known what he had done to his brother Abel and the vengeance decreed against anyone who tried to “avenge” Abel’s blood.   Again, we do not know.  All we know is that Lamech knows about the vengeance if anyone were to harm Cain because Lamech mentions it in his statement to his wives. B124624A-3D36-45A7-9CE8-43E4CE051902

But here Lamech thinks that his own sin of murder isn’t possibly as bad as Cain’s and therefore he (Lamech) should have more vengeance if someone tries to harm him because of his sin.  Basically, he is saying, “Listen my wives.  While it is true I did something bad, it wasn’t nearly as bad as what Cain did.  I was JUSTIFIED because that man injured me, whereas Cain killed Abel when Abel did nothing to him to deserve it.  The man I killed deserved it.”  Doesn’t it amaze you how he tries to justify his sin of murder and make himself out to be the victim in the situation? And doesn’t it amaze you how he feels that he is worthy to pass judgement on anyone who tries to harm him because of his sin?

It is of further curiosity to see how the writer of Genesis leaves the story there.  He mentions it and then nothing further is noted.  Why even mention it?  It had to have some importance if it were to be mentioned and included in the Bible.  I think the lessons here are to show us that civilization had continued to degrade into a downward sinful spiral.  That only five generations removed from the first-born child of Adam and Eve,  man had continued to disregard God and HIS laws.  It also shows us that man had no reverence for God in that man thought he could place himself into the righteous seat of God and invoke a binding punishment on his fellow man.

We never hear from Lamech again, nor do we know what happened to him.  I do know this, however.  Lamech eventually died, whether by the hands of another or by natural causes.  Lamech’s sin will be judged and he will be held to account by the only One who can pronounce judgement – God – and this God sees all and saw the truth to what Lamech had done – just as He does with us.

 

Let the Punishment Fit the Crime.

As a young child, I remember misbehaving and having my mother pronounce punishment for whatever “crime” I had committed against childhood humanity.  I used to think, at times, that her punishment was unjust and didn’t fit my offense.  And along those same lines, the punishment given to Adam and Eve certainly didn’t fit their offense.

After they had eaten from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, the Bible states that the eyes of both of them were opened – opened to the realities that there were dark forces in the world to counter the goodness they had only known from God.  Opened to their human condition and the world in which they lived.  And opened to the fact that they had disobeyed God, and He would find out. It almost paints a picture of  a childlike existence in the Garden until they had eaten the fruit and their eyes were opened, doesn’t it?

0E047C61-A822-4738-91B6-F07AF6D5AAFCBut because of their disobedience, God pronounces judgement.  He could have simply destroyed them and started over with the creation of human beings.  But God does not do that, even though their disobedience certainly warranted death.  Do you notice that He does not start with the woman who was the first one to disobey Him?  He starts with the serpent.  And the words He uses are, “Because you have done this”, done what you might ask?  The serpent had tempted Eve in her naïveté.  When Satan entered the serpent, he did not go and tempt the man.  The man had the direct command of God and knew exactly what God had told him. However, the woman did not.  She had heard the command from man and when the serpent played on the words, she didn’t know the exact truth.  Therefore, since the serpent went against God’s command for established humanity, God not only changes the physical appearance of the serpent, but He adds to the punishment of the serpent the eternal damnation that would be coming to him in the future.  And the very woman that he tricked would produce generations of people from which Jesus Christ would come.  Notice God says, “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush you head and you will strike his heel.”  So the descendent of the woman, Jesus Christ, would deal a death blow to Satan and that best that Satan would do would be to organize events to culminate with Christ’s death upon the cross.  But little did he know that very act would bring about salvation for all of mankind whom the serpent had desired to see fall short of God’s grace and enter into eternal damnation with his trickery.

And to the woman, God adds no scolding at the beginning, as He did for the serpent, and as He would do to the man.  He simply pronounces judgement on her and  woman’s punishment speaks of her very function – childbirth.  God increased the pains that she was going to experience and gave her an internal struggle that would always cause her to want to rule over her husband, kind of like she did in the garden.  However, God would never allow woman to rule man again, although there would always be an internal desire to do so.

But for Adam God offers an additional scolding, “Because you listened to your wife and ate from the tree which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat of it’…God is telling Adam that he should have known better because he had received the direct command from God Himself.  And that no matter what the woman said, Adam should not have listened to her.  So God curses the very function of man – which was labor.  And then He introduced the death factor, “By the sweat of your brow you will eat your food until you return to the ground, since from it you were taken; for dust you are and to dust you will return.”

Up to this point there had been no death.  And the very thing which God had told Adam at the beginning was now going to come to pass – “but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die.” And it wasn’t just man who would die.  Animals were also affected.  The animals that had done nothing wrong were now under the curse because of man’s sin.  And the first to animals to die would be used for their skin to cover the nakedness of the man and the woman.

And so, as in many sins, there were innocent victims. Victims who had done nothing to deserve their punishment and had committed no crime.